Deaf Insight.

Before I go sleep, let me share this from Deaf Read.
Over the years, I’ve learned to accept that I’ll never know everything that’s being said but…..there’s times when the sheer lack of consideration stabs my heart.

It’s the little things ,saying “never mind” instead of repeating, giving the “Readers Digest “version instead of the whole story. Picking a restaurant that’s dimly lit.

Awhile back,I was talking with a friend about missing out at backyard parties. You see,when it gets dark and everyone else gathers around the fire to talk and share stories….I go inside because I can’t read lips in the darkness and I won’t just sit there,pretending to understand.
This guy said something that touched my soul. He said,”I’ll go inside with you” and while we’ve never been at an evening outdoor event ,I know that if he had the chance, he’ll come sit with me, wherever I can read his lips.
It’s taken me a long,long time to accept my deafness ….and to appreciate the different gift it is.
Now…truth be told,I consider my deafness an asset and not a disability.
After all,I have the best excuse to sit closer and look into the eyes of whoever I’m with,and to touch them and be completely in tune.

I just ask for you to leave the lights on,sit close and look me the eye.

One thought on “Deaf Insight.

  1. I can’t count how many times this has happened to me. There was even a lady at the local Social Services office who became livid when I asked if she could please write down what she was saying because I couldn’t understand (this was a woman who interacted with disabled folks all day long but probably shouldn’t have been in that field of work with that attitude). Or, people refusing to assist with phone calls, including close family members who would become angry if I asked for help. And why? Because it was an inconvenience for them, nothing more. So, yes, I can identify with all you’ve written here, Jeanna. I’m still struggling to get to the “deaf acceptance” stage, but it’s difficult to persevere when hearing people brush us off with a flip or cavalier “Never mind…” Thanks for speaking up about this. Hearing people need to understand how their words (heard or unheard) affect those of us who are deaf or hard-of-hearing.

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